Fredericksen Wilderness Park is aptly named–all woods, with a dense trail network through thick woods. And yet, it has some surprises to it, including some runnable forest that is useful for contour practice, and a popular disc golf course!

ABOUT THE PERMANENT COURSE

This venue features a permanent course, which you can do at any time! To try it out, print the PDF map and control descriptions below (or simply open them on your smart phone), read the instructions on the permanent course page, and have fun!

  1. Print/view the map
  2. Print/view the control description
  3. Learn the basics on the Permanent Course page

CascadeOC supports many permanent courses over a large geographic area. This makes it challenging for our volunteers to keep up with maintenance and information on their condition. If you observe any damaged, obscured, or missing markers, please notify Thomas Lanphear.

To find more venues with permanent courses, visit the Map of Maps page, where each permanent course is marked by a yellow pin.

Note: Samples of the map are provided here for educational purposes only; the map shown here is not kept up-to-date.

The permanent orienteering courses at Fredericksen Wilderness Park were designed and installed as a Boy Scout Eagle Award Service Project by Sean Dougherty, Boy Scout Troop 1571, Poulsbo, WA.

The purpose of providing these navigational and physical ratings below is to provide greater context for how challenging an orienteering course at this venue might be. For example, an advanced-level course at a local city park will be easier to complete than an advanced-level course in the mountains.

Navigational Challenge Rating: 5

Despite being a small (1:4,000-scale) park, the dens trail network in the woods provides a navigational challenge. Either you will learn compass skills, or get really good at trail-counting, which sometimes gets difficult in areas of minimal forest floor vegetation. Great for learning both contours and compass skills.

Physical Challenge Rating: 6

This whole park is on a hillside. The contours are only 3-meter intervals, but there are 30 of them. So you’re going to be going up and down a lot…and each 100 meters of vertical climb is equivalent to another kilometer of horizontal travel. Great leg workout!